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On this page you will find short bite-sized cards with information on sexual, romantic, and gender minorities featured on our badges.

The same info is provided below in text format for accessible purposes.

You are welcome to save and distribute these cards and info on them. Likewise, if you have some feedback and ideas for improvement, please get in touch. 

BILOBITE

Here to represent bisexuality/biromanticism

A bisexual person experiences sexual attraction to persons of the same and different genders. A biromantic person experiences romantic attraction to persons of the same and different genders. 

As the oldest and most recognizable multi-sexual/ romantic orientation, it has undergone some changes in definition (see note). Controversy arose over the “bi” prefix which was believed to limit gender to the binary "woman" and "man". However, as the language around gender evolved, the bisexual community has come to include non-binary persons in their definition.

Although bisexuality broadly overlaps with pansexuality and omnisexuality, there are subtle differences and a person may find one label more fitting for themselves.

More info on bi.org.

 

PANLOBITE
Here to represent pansexuality/panromanticism

A pansexual person experiences sexual attraction to persons regardless of their gender. A panromantic person experience romantic attraction to persons regardless of their gender. 

Often called the “gender-blind” sexual/romantic orientation as many pans say they are attracted to people, and that gender is not a factor in their attraction.  .

Rapidly rising in popularity as the second most common multi-sexual/ romantic orientation, pans are sometimes non-binary people wishing to distance themselves from the “bi” prefix of bisexuality that previously had binary gender connotations.

 

Although pansexuality broadly overlaps with bisexuality and omnisexuality, there are subtle differences and a person may find one label more fitting for themselves.

POLYBITE

Here to represent polysexuality/polyromanticism

A polysexual person  experiences sexual attraction towards more than one, but not all genders. A polyromantic person  experiences romantic attraction or desire towards more than one, but not all genders.

Not to be confused with polyamory -  intimate involvement with multiple persons at once, or pansexuality - attraction to ALL genders.

One of the newer orientations grown out of moving away from the binary gender concept. The polysexual flag's pink stripe represents attraction to women, its green stripe represents attraction to people who identify outside the traditional woman-man binary, and its blue stripe represents attraction to men.

 

AROBITE
Here to represent aromanticism

An aromantic person neither experiences romantic attraction nor desires a romantic relationship. 

 

Aromantic people might experience other types of love and attraction (platonic, aesthetic, sensual – to name a few) and strive to develop emotional connections with people. 

Aromantic people can still experience sexual attraction and be of any sexuality.

Aromantic people can still desire life-long platonic partnerships.

ARO SPECTRUM 

Some more common romantic orientations under the aromantic umbrella:

•DEMIROMANTICISM – a person experiences romantic attraction and/or desire only after a strong emotional bond is formed.

•GREY(A)ROMANTICISM – romantic attraction extremely rare, infrequent or otherwise in the grey area.

More info on aromantic.wikia.org

TRANSLOBITE

Here to represent transgenderism

A transgender person is a person who identifies differently than a gender assigned to their sex at birth. 

 

The transgender label encompasses both people of the more-traditionally binary gender identity and people of non-binary identity. 

 

Note: Gender is here used as internalised feeling of one self’s (social) identity in the context of how norms function in one’s culture. This is an attempt at claiming autonomy over interactions with people shaped by the social construct of gender. .

The still mainstream explanation of a X brain in Y body is now outdated both due to science progress and language change.

Transgender umbrella is about queer gender identities, not sexuality. Transgender people can be of any sexual and romantic identity.

Many transgender people experience gender dysphoria but intensity and type varies among individuals

Persons who are not transgender are called cisgender.

ENBYLOBITE
Here to represent non-binary

Non-binary (NB) is a younger twin of genderqueer representing a wide spectrum of gender identities, varying in intensity and conformity to one of the binary gender concepts.   

NB represents identities outside of strict and static gender binary. The only rule is that there are no rules.

Note: Gender is here used as internalized feeling of one self’s (social) identity in the context of how norms function in our culture. This is an attempt at claiming autonomy over interactions with people shaped by the social construct of gender.

Non-binary identities can express a combination of femininity and masculinity, or neither, in their gender expression.

Gender non-conformity, gender queerness, and non-binary are different words used to describe the same concept.

Non-binary umbrella has many gender identities, some of most common ones being bigender, genderfluid, agender/genderless, pangender, trigender, neutrois, demigender, etc.

Even though non-binary is technically part of trans umbrella, not all non-binary people identify as trans.

ACELOBITE

Here to represent asexuality.

An asexual person does not experience sexual attraction – they are not drawn to people sexually and do not desire to act upon attraction to others in a sexual way.

 

Not to be confused with celibacy, which is a chosen abstinence from sexual activity

Asexual people might experience other types of attraction (romantic, aesthetic, sensual – to name a few) and strive to develop emotional connections with people. 

Asexual people can be sex repulsed, averse, indifferent, or favourable. Arousal capabilities, libido, and participation in sexual activities varies among asexual people, but does not play a part in sexual identification.

ACE SPECTRUM 

Some more common sexualities under the asexual umbrella:

•DEMISEXUALITY – a person experiences sexual attraction only after a strong emotional bond is formed

•GREY(A)SEXUALITY – sexual attraction is extremely rare or otherwise in the grey area.

More info on www.asexuality.org

POLYAMOBITE

Here to represent polyamory

Polyamory is the practice of, or desire for, intimate relationships with more than one partner at the same time, with the full knowledge and consent of all parties involved.

 

Often described as “consensual, ethical, and responsible non-monogamy”.

The polyamorous community rejects the view that sexual and romantic exclusivity are necessary for deep, committed, long-term relationships.

Polyamory is more about romantic than sexual relationships, as it involves commitment to building lasting relationships that meet the needs of the people involved. But of course, it can be built around sexual relationships as well.

 

 

Polyamorous relationships come in many forms, but they all need to be built on honesty, openness and communication. 

More info onwww.morethantwo.com

GQLOBITE

Here to represent genderqueerness

Genderqueer(ness) can be used as an adjective, a noun, or as a personal identity denoting or relating to a person who does not subscribe to conventional gender distinctions and rules.  

Genderqueerness is not a new concept, and queer people have always been showing defiance to gender norms and redefining personal relationship to them.

Note: Gender is here used in a more traditional way, as a set of characteristics assigned to sexed persons that guide /direct them through their lives.

Genderqueer emerged in the 1980s and 1990s out of need for an all-inclusive term for individuals pushing gender rules hand in hand with sexual rules,

and questioning norms around class and race.

 

As queer activism and political organizing grew in the early ‘90s, genderqueer became a way for transgender people to be part of the broader movement.

 

More on contemporary approach to binary gender defiance will be presented by enbylobite.

More on the history of gq on inqueery by them (You Tube).